2013 One Word 365

amplifyYear in Review

In 2013, I attempted a One Word 365 approach to goal setting. In previous years of traditional SMART goal setting, I achieved more than I would had I not written anything down, sure, but my goal reaching felt disconnected and unbalanced, kind of like having only part of my house clean.

So in 2013, my goal to amplify my life as a whole focused on taking what’s working well and making it better. (You can read more about it in Amplify, How to… Amplify and Vacation Reflections: Resolutions.) Not only did this change my approach in every area, amplifying became a part of what I do as daily habit.

Specifically, amplifying changed…

  • My writing life by increasing daily word count, focusing more in application and doing the actions on a consistent basis that make me a writer.
  • The way I teach. Instead of getting as much in as possible into a certain amount of time, I focus on a few important points and drive those home. We go deeper with a few rather than stay on the surface with many.
  • How I parent. I nag less & listen more. I pray for my kids as much or more than I talk to them about how and what (I think) they should be doing.
  • How I read. Instead of just getting from cover to cover, I reader slower and allow for healthy digestion of the material rather than wolfing down words and finding myself with nothing but indigestion.
  • My exercise routine. Instead of feeling like I need to be like others around me when it comes to exercise (especially biking & running), I focus on what works best for me, which means lots of variety and the goals of healthy and strong instead of skinny and competitive.

More progress than just that listed above existed in 2013, but these stand out as ones most linked to obedience to calling. These amplified areas of my life now fuel all the other areas, thus amplifying them as well.

What about you? Do you take a traditional approach to goal setting? If so, how do you feel about your success with that approach? Or, do you take a non-traditional approach such as One Word 365? If you do, what kind of success are you having? Please share successes, failures, wishes & dreams with regard to goal setting!

10 thoughts on “2013 One Word 365

  1. That sounds awesome Kari all that you accomplished. I do best if I set my daily tasks around the things that are most important to me. I then ask what will have the most impact if I were to do that in whatever area I am focused on. I have some things that I do because I have decided I will do them everyday regardless such as exercise. I did some 30 challenges in 2013 and that was enjoyable and I was able to accomplish some things I would not have done otherwise.

    • I do that too, Mark. I set daily & weekly "to do" lists based on what's important for me to accomplish. My motto for accomplishing is usually "Do what's next." In other words, I focus on what needs done first, when the next due date is based on what I've already filtered as most important. I also have things that are automatic because they've been decided ahead of time. Sounds like we have a lot of the same approaches. It's all about being deliberate.

  2. I do a little bit of each. I always have one or two areas of character growth I'm working on. Last year it was how to use my time well and how to keep God first while writing. I had great success with the first one, and success with the second one, but that goal involves so many areas that I am still working on it and still have a ways to go. It continues to be my most important goal for this next year: how to write in fellowship with God while keeping Him first in my life.

    Last year was also the first year I delved in the to smart goal idea – making definite time goals with plans and shorter goals on the way. And that was pretty life-changing as far as what I was able to accomplish writing-wise.

    Although for me, the thing that most helps isn't the setting of the goals but abiding in the Word and renewing my mind so God can help me achieve the goals and so the goals themselves don't become gods. Since I am not an accomplishment person by nature, there is no way I can accomplish goals in my own strength – except for my recreation goals. :)

    • I just love everything you have to say here, Barb. I like your approach, and your willingness to carry a goal over to the next year, recognizing that it needs more. The focus on God & fellowship with Him is huge. I also really like what you said about goals not becoming gods. I know you're busy and understand if you say "no," but I would love for you to write a guest post and expand on what you talk about here. Email me if you're interested.

  3. You have had a great year on your blog! It's been wonderful to see you become a better and more focused blogger. I can't wait to see what this year offers you!!! Keep up the amazing work.

  4. I love New Year's resolutions, but I also love resolutions at any time of year. So I've had the opportunity to switch up my goal-setting approaches over the years. I think the one that works for me the best is to generally keep a short list of goals I really want to work on – not all the goals I have, but the few that are the cream of the crop and will take up the majority of my concentration and effort. Then I make sure that I'm working every day doing something for the goals on that short list.
    My recent post Numbering Your Days While Kneeling by a Deathbed

    • I like your approach, Loren. It's prioritizing at it's best. I think that's why I shortened mine to usually 5 specific goals and then had an over-riding theme through the one-word approach. And, I have no problem resetting and making new goals at any time of year. I just think most people need the yearly reminder and that it does something to "reset" ourselves with the new year sometimes.

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