Refocusing on Christ

Should & Could But Don’t

There’s so much information available telling us what we should be doing and how we could be improving our lives. Just take a look at the self-help books currently on shelves, virtual or otherwise, not to mention the many Internet resources dedicated to the task.

With all these resources telling us what we could and should do, self-improvement can seem impossible. Even when we find ways we actually want to change and techniques that would work, we still often just don’t do them.

Why? Too much work. The pain of staying where we are still isn’t bigger than the pain of changing. Or, maybe you’ve taken some of the advice, and implemented change. After a while, though, you find yourself back to your old habits and way of thinking.

This happens with Scripture too. We read it. We know what we should do. But, we don’t do it. Paul describes this struggle well.

I do not understand what I do. For what I want to do I do not do, but what I hate I do…. For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out. For I do not do the good I want to do, but the evil I do not want to do—this I keep on doing.” (Romans 7:15-19)

Refocus Your Identity

If I dwell on how much I should do and could do but don’t do, I get overwhelmed. Discouragement usually follows. And eventually, I simply feel like a failure.

For many, the solution involves just not thinking about it. Just don’t consider the changes you should and could make. Stay ignorant. Stay conveniently confused. Stay too busy.

My personality doesn’t generally allow for this. It prefers ruminating about how much I haven’t done and then succumbing to depression and defeat.

Whatever your tendency, be sure of this. If you never do any of what you should or could do, you’re accepted, secure and significant. Even if you somehow managed to do all of what you think you should or could do, you’re not any more or less accepted, secure, and significant.

When you accepted Christ as Savior and made him Lord of your life, you were fully justified — declared righteous — at that moment. Your Identity In Christ is secure. Nothing else you can or think you should do will make you any more accepted, secure and significant than you were at that moment. With that realization comes an amazing peace.

“Therefore, since we have been justified through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.” (Romans 5:1)

Refocus on Jesus

That doesn’t mean we can ignore how we should and could improve. But, it does change our motivation for doing so. With that motivation change comes a refocus on progress toward perfection — on progressive sanctification.

Continue to work out your salvation with fear and trembling, for it is God who works in you to will and to act in order to fulfill his good purpose.” (Philippians 2:12-13)

This is the process of spiritual growth. In general, it involves letting the Holy Spirit work change in us and then doing our part to live out that change.

Train yourself to be godly.” (1 Timothy 4:7)

Even that process can seem overwhelming at times. But that’s usually when we focus on ourselves; at least, that’s my continual struggle. In fact, the only way I’ve been able to maintain consistency in living the fact that I am accepted, secure and significant is by focusing on Christ.

“Let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles. And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us, fixing our eyes on Jesus, the pioneer and perfecter of faith. For the joy set before him he endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God. Consider him who endured such opposition from sinners, so that you will not grow weary and lose heart. (Hebrews 12:1-3)

Today as I again struggle with feeling out of balance and out of sync, I am reminded yet again that I am still accepted, secure and significant. So, instead of letting depression or anxiety or defeat take over again, I remember my secure position and turn once more back toward the reason it exists.

Not Just A Baby In A Manger

baby jesus

No Doubt About Jesus

All parents dreams of what their child will one day grow to be. I am no different with my boys. What career will they choose? What about sports? Who will they marry? Parents usually have tremendous hopes and dreams for their kids, but they have no way of knowing for sure what they will become.

When Jesus was a baby, his mother did not have to wonder what He would grow up to be. Isaiah made very clear what baby Jesus would one day do and be.

“For to us a child is born, to us a son is given, and the government will be on his shoulders. And he will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Of the greatness of his government and peace there will be no end. He will reign on David’s throne and over his kingdom, establishing and upholding it with justice and righteousness from that time on and forever. The zeal of the Lord Almighty will accomplish this.” (Isaiah 9:6-7)

Whatever my children will one day be are only guesses teeming with possibilities for greatness. When Jesus was a baby and even many years before he was born, his destiny of greatness was already clear.

Focus on Jesus

This Christmas season, make a deliberate effort to focus not only on Jesus as a baby, but also on your current relationship with Him and how you are growing in that relationship. Intentionally consider the fact that this baby in the Nativity scene at Christmas is a King worthy of your best.

As the “Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace,” ask yourself if Jesus is getting your best. Remember that He knows your past, present and future, and He loves you exactly as you are today. He deserves the best you have to give.

What can you deliberately and intentionally change your focus to make sure Jesus is getting your best every day?

 

Journey to a Joyous Christmas

A joyous Christmas happens when we choose to journey to meet Christ. Christmas motivates us to step outside of our everyday lives and experience the most momentous event in history. Let’s consider this idea of journeying to meet Christ in light of that first Christmas celebrated over 2000 years ago.

Luke 1:39-56

When she found out she was pregnant, Mary journeyed to visit her cousin Elizabeth. Pregnant with her own miracle baby, Elizabeth encouraged Mary. Mary to then rejoiced in her personal journey with God.

Luke 2:1-7

Mary & Joseph journeyed to Bethlehem for the census. The struggle to secure appropriate lodging resulted in possibly the most unassuming, simple entry into this world that God as flesh could make.

Luke 2:8-20

The shepherds journeyed to see Jesus after being encouraged by the angels’ praise. The shepherds “told everyone what had happened and what the angel had said to them about this child,” and they “went back to their fields and flocks, glorifying God for what the angels had told them.”

The journeys taken that first Christmas point toward a journey each of us must take if we hope to truly experience a joyous Christmas. Consider the following aspects as you make the journey this year toward a joyous Christmas.

  1. Christmas intensifies feelings.

    The shepherds’ reaction to their journey as well as Mary’s expression during her visit with Elizabeth illustrate this point well. Unfortunately, bad feelings can intensify too. Focus expectations on Jesus rather than on the world’s view of Christmas to make sure good feelings intensify instead.

  2. Words impact Christmas joy.

    Elizabeth’s words encouraged Mary. The angel’s words encouraged the shepherds. In both cases, encouraging words resulted in tremendous joy that spread to others. Our words can destroy or build Christmas joy. Think before speaking at Christmas and also year round.

  3. A joyous Christmas comes from a focus on Jesus.

    Elizabeth’s encouragement focused on God. So did Mary’s response. The angels’ song focused on God. So did the shepherds’ response to that song as well as their response to seeing Jesus. All experienced a joyous first Christmas because of a focus on God through His Son’s birth. Then and still today, when Jesus is the focus, joy is the result.

Life constantly serves up a full menu of distractions. Biblical history shows this as much as our own calendars and checkbooks today. The journey to a joyous Christmas comes through a deliberate choice to push through, and most likely to push away, distractions and to instead deliberately focus on Jesus.

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